Download 2018 Annual Report as a PDF

The Power
of Connection

2018 Annual Report

The Power
of Connection

2018 Annual Report

We put meaningful connections at the center of our work each day

We put meaningful connections at the center of our work each day

Table of Contents

In 2018, we focused on deepening our connections with the millions of caring adults who touch the lives of infants and toddlers.

Executive Director Matthew Melmed recently sat down with our Board President Paul Spicer and Board Vice President Brenda Jones Harden to discuss the importance of connections, the impact of our work, and their excitement for ZERO TO THREE’s future. Here’s a quick look at highlights from their inspiring conversation.

MATTHEW
“Today, more and more professionals understand that they need to know more about infant and early childhood mental health and early emotional connections. More policymakers are talking about meaningful changes to support parents too, whether it’s paid family leave or better child care, particularly for babies and toddlers who face adversity.”

“My hope is that we can deepen the impact of our work, so we can build a society with the knowledge and will to ensure that every baby has the strongest start in life. I know that this is possible with the support of our funding partners and donors, our Board Members, our staff , and ZERO TO THREE members. I’m really excited about the future.”

PAUL
“We confront so many challenges as a society that if we’re all stuck in the traumas of our childhoods, we’re not going to be able to weather them. Should ZERO TO THREE realize its vision for all babies, the future really would be limitless. In an ideal future, all babies would have what they need: safety, security, and health.”

BRENDA
“Science tells us that early experiences really do matter, and the connections that we have with the caregivers in our lives make a real difference in how we see and understand the world.”

“ZERO TO THREE occupies a unique position in the early childhood landscape. We focus on a relatively small age range, but our reach is broad–from family, to policies, to all the service settings that touch the lives of infants. In terms of giving voice to the needs of babies, we don’t leave any stone unturned.”

Matthew Melmed, J.D.
Executive Director

Paul G. Spicer, Ph.D.
Board President

Brenda Jones Harden, Ph.D.
Board Vice President

By the Numbers

Multiplying our impact

  • ■ 2018
  • ■ 2017

Unique Web Visitors

3,234,646

2018
2,558,751
2,558,751

Organization Members

3,998

2018
2,379
2,379

Downloads of Organization’s Materials

273,233

2018
210,352
210,352

51

Strolling Thunder Families and Babies Brought to Washington

338

Training Workshops

2,097

Media Articles Highlighting Our Work and Perspective

32,402

Professionals Attending Training

68,187

Policy Network Members

271,187

Video Views on YouTube and Vimeo

Our Impact

Supporting parents building the most important bonds

PARENTING

Strong connections right from the start

Children learn from birth and rely on parents and the other caregivers in their lives to protect and care for them. The impact of parents may never be greater than during the earliest years of life, when a child’s brain is developing most rapidly. One of the many ways we help parents build secure and loving relationships with their children is through our Positive Parenting infographic, which highlights nine primary parental behaviors that support a child’s capacity to love, trust, explore, and learn—the foundation of positive life outcomes.

Strong connections right from the start

Children learn from birth and rely on parents and the other caregivers in their lives to protect and care for them. The impact of parents may never be greater than during the earliest years of life, when a child’s brain is developing most rapidly. One of the many ways we help parents build secure and loving relationships with their children is through our Positive Parenting infographic, which highlights nine primary parental behaviors that support a child’s capacity to love, trust, explore, and learn—the foundation of positive life outcomes.

Expanding our reach with media partners

ZERO TO THREE recognizes the powerful influence of modern media to elevate and amplify positive messages about parenting. We teamed up with the award-winning television show Black-ish in its fourth season. With a new baby added to the cast, we helped the writing team bring positive parenting messages into the homes of millions of families and engaged in lively conversation on social media.

Blackish Logo

Keeping families strong across the miles

To further our mission to support families, we’ve launched Babies on the Homefront 2.0, a free mobile app designed to support the unique needs of military-connected families with young children. Families now have at their fingertips a treasure trove of positive parenting resources, including fun ideas for playtime and tips for supporting their child’s development, even during long deployments. The app also provides a secure, convenient place to share and save photos and videos that capture precious moments, and it includes emojis to share feelings with their child.

Babies on the Homefront 2.0


The free app, sponsored by USAA, is available in both English and Spanish on Apple and Android devices.

Understanding the needs of today’s parents

In the spring of 2018, ZERO TO THREE and its partners at the Bezos Family Foundation, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Einhorn Family Charitable Trust, and the Overdeck Family Foundation commissioned a national survey, Millennial Connections, to explore how and where parents of young children seek information about parenting, including the topics they search and the sources they trust. Survey results showed that parents most often rely on their own social networks for advice, with 86% of parents turning to immediate family members for information.

Understanding the needs of today’s parents

In the spring of 2018, ZERO TO THREE and its partners at the Bezos Family Foundation, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Einhorn Family Charitable Trust, and the Overdeck Family Foundation commissioned a national survey, Millennial Connections, to explore how and where parents of young children seek information about parenting, including the topics they search and the sources they trust. Survey results showed that parents most often rely on their own social networks for advice, with 86% of parents turning to immediate family members for information.

SCREEN
SENSE

Making screen time learning time for babies and toddlers

Babies today are born into a world full of rich human interaction and engaging screen media experiences. This leaves parents with a lot of questions about the role that screen media should play in their children’s lives. To provide clear answers and guidance, we updated Screen Sense—a resource series that summarizes the latest research on screens and children under age 3. Screen Sense provides useful tips for parents who choose to make screen media a part of children’s lives, so they can do so in a way that harnesses the potential of technology to enhance learning and development.

Learn more:
zerotothree.org/screensense

Making screen time learning time for babies and toddlers

Babies today are born into a world full of rich human interaction and engaging screen media experiences. This leaves parents with a lot of questions about the role that screen media should play in their children’s lives. To provide clear answers and guidance, we updated Screen Sense—a resource series that summarizes the latest research on screens and children under age 3. Screen Sense provides useful tips for parents who choose to make screen media a part of children’s lives, so they can do so in a way that harnesses the potential of technology to enhance learning and development.

Learn more:
zerotothree.org/screensense

PROFESSIONALS

Sharing knowledge and building skills

One professional who has worked in the early childhood field for 25 years shared that a ZERO TO THREE workshop she participated in “stands out as one of the most significant I have ever attended. The curriculum developers and faculty were the most knowledgeable, open, and respectful presenters I have known.”

“I am awed and inspired,” said another learner.

In May 2018, we launched the ZERO TO THREE Learning Center—the hub for our data-supported, research-informed, competency-based professional development programs that elevate the knowledge, skills, and abilities of multidisciplinary professionals serving young children and their families. Bolstering ZERO TO THREE’s leadership in supporting the early childhood field, we established our inaugural Trainer Certification program and Faculty Institutes for Higher Education. These new initiatives expand the reach of our three signature professional development programs: Critical Competencies for Infant-Toddler Educators, DC:0-5, and The Growing Brain. Our team of experts trained 800 participants in person, supported more than 630 professionals engaged in our online courses, facilitated more than 25 webinars, and hosted a series of trainer support events.

Our expert trainers reached within and across early childhood sectors, effectively translating complex research and concepts into usable content and valuable learning moments. Across all our offerings, our relationship-based approach was repeatedly praised as a key ingredient in helping learners achieve real and meaningful growth.

We also continued to deepen our support of early childhood professionals with the growth of the ZERO TO THREE Membership program, which celebrated its second anniversary in 2018. We ended the year with 3,715 members from the United States and 283 international members representing 41 countries. Our online community, Member Connect, marked the anniversary with the launch of an online Summer Book Club series through which members connected with best-selling authors such as Kathy Hirsch-Pasek, PhD, and Alicia Lieberman, PhD.

The ZERO TO THREE Annual Conference 2017 was held in sunny San Diego and drew nearly 3,500 attendees from around the world, offered more than 100 opportunities for participants to learn and network, and featured 200 speakers. From community-based approaches, to early intervention, to creating a culture of parent engagement, the robust agenda of plenary and breakout sessions addressed the most urgent and critical issues aff ecting babies and families. Participants returned home ready to shine with new knowledge and a renewed sense of urgency to form life-changing connections with the children and families they serve.

QUICK FACTS:

Membership
Program

3,715

members from the
United States

283

international members

41

countries represented

2017
Annual Conference

3,500

attendees

100

opportunities for
participants to learn
and network

200

speakers

“I am awed and inspired.

— Learning Center workshop participant

Learn more:
healthysteps.org
TRANSFORMING HEALTHCARE

Transforming systems to put healthy families first

The network effect

Pediatric primary care is the one system in the United States that regularly touches almost all families with young children, making pediatric offices the ideal platform for providing comprehensive services to ensure that babies and toddlers have a healthy start in life. ZERO TO THREE’s HealthySteps program is an evidence-based, interdisciplinary pediatric primary care program that promotes positive parenting and healthy development for babies and toddlers, with an emphasis on families living in low-income communities.

HealthySteps continued to expand its reach and impact as we welcomed Rahil Briggs, PsyD, as the program’s new national director. A nationally known psychology expert, Dr. Briggs brings to ZERO TO THREE more than a decade of experience launching, scaling, and leading the system-wide HealthySteps program at Montefiore Health System in New York.

2018 Healthy Steps Sites

We are committed
to doubling the number
of families and young
children served over
the next 5 years.

Thanks to the program’s 2018 expansion into 28 new sites and 5 new states, tens of thousands more children and families are benefiting from HealthySteps. As of the end of 2018, 136,000 children in 20 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico were served by the network’s 137 sites. This growth was driven by both the strategic targeting of priority states by ZERO TO THREE and unprecedented community-level interest in the model.

We are grateful for the generous support of Blue Meridian Partners, which has invested in the first phase of HealthySteps’ long-term growth plan. Together we are committed to doubling the number of families and young children served over the next 5 years, and to ultimately reaching more than 1 million children annually by 2032, while transforming the promise of pediatric care.

QUICK FACTS:

5

new states

137

sites

136,000

children served

QUICK FACTS:

5

new states

137

sites

136,000

children served

TRANSFORMING CHILD WELFARE

Working together
to reunite families

ZERO TO THREE’s Safe Babies Court Team™ helps communities address serious
issues that result in families losing custody of their young children.

Safe Babies Court Team connects families with the services they need to transform their lives and provide their children with the support that will help them to grow and thrive, while ensuring that the parents are reunited with their babies as swiftly as possible.

The approach is working. After losing custody of her children, Rachel, a mother of six, was given new hope as a parent after a team composed of a judge, a case worker, staff members of a childhood development agency, and others worked with her to address the challenges that were preventing her from being able to fully care for her children. Rachel lost custody of her twin sons because her substance abuse problems prevented her from working steadily and securing reliable housing. Under the traditional foster care/court system, Rachel would have had little chance of being reunited with her children.

But ZERO TO THREE’s Safe Babies Court Team helped her create a plan to stay sober, providing her with substance abuse counseling and employment assistance, while allowing her to forge a relationship with the child care facility that her sons attended. The long, hard work paid off. She obtained regular and reliable work, and, for the first time in her life, secured steady housing for herself and her family. Rachel reunited with the twins and has provided a stable, permanent home for them for more than 5 years. “This is the first time anyone listened to me speak in my life,” she said of the experience.

Rachel is not alone-across the country, the Safe Babies Court Team is serving as a model of shared responsibility for improving the lives of families. This approach is transforming the child welfare system into one of child well-being.

QUICK FACTS:

Children with closed cases supported by Safe Babies Court Team

83.75%

in permanent homes within 12 months (compared to national standard of 40.5%)

0.7%

recurrence of maltreatment (compared to national standard of 9.1%)

QUICK FACTS:

Children with closed cases supported by Safe Babies Court Team

83.75%

in permanent homes within 12 months (compared to national standard of 40.5%)

0.7%

recurrence of maltreatment (compared to national standard of 9.1%)

“This is the first time anyone listened to me speak in my life.”

— Rachel, mother of six

POLICY

We are
better
together

Learn more:
thinkbabies.org

In a sea of business suits on Capitol Hill, a brigade of baby strollers is an unusual sight. But that was the scene one spring day in Washington, DC, for the second annual Strolling Thunder™, the marquee event for Think Babies™, ZERO TO THREE’s advocacy campaign to make the potential of every baby a national priority. Families visited more than 160 Congressional offices to urge members of Congress to prioritize investments in our nation’s youngest children.

Lauren Rangel of Austin, Texas, participated in the event with her husband and three children. On this trip, her first to the nation’s capital, Rangel had the opportunity to share her story and advocate for policies and programs that families like hers need to thrive. The experience ignited a passion for advocacy in Rangel. Now a public policy fellow at Easterseals Central Texas, Lauren mobilizes other parents to share their stories. “[Strolling Thunder] made me realize just how important it was to not tune out, because decisions that impact our lives are being made every day, whether or not we choose to engage.”

Decisions that affect babies and families are made at all levels of government, not only on Capitol Hill. For that reason, ZERO TO THREE expanded its Think Babies campaign to six states: Colorado, Georgia, New Jersey, North Carolina, Rhode Island, and Washington. Our state partners have engaged more than 350 stakeholders in infant-toddler coalitions, hosted state Strolling Thunder events, and held numerous parent advocacy trainings and listening tours.

To amplify the Think Babies message, we formed relationships with leading children’s policy and advocacy organizations, bringing our roster of national partners to 53 organizations. New national partners added in 2018 include Sesame Workshop, Education Trust, United Parent Leaders Action Network, PolicyLink, and Help Me Grow National Center.

In a sea of business suits on Capitol Hill, a brigade of baby strollers is an unusual sight. But that was the scene one spring day in Washington, DC, for the second annual Strolling Thunder™, the marquee event for Think Babies™, ZERO TO THREE’s advocacy campaign to make the potential of every baby a national priority. Families visited more than 160 Congressional offices to urge members of Congress to prioritize investments in our nation’s youngest children.

Lauren Rangel of Austin, Texas, participated in the event with her husband and three children. On this trip, her first to the nation’s capital, Rangel had the opportunity to share her story and advocate for policies and programs that families like hers need to thrive. The experience ignited a passion for advocacy in Rangel. Now a public policy fellow at Easterseals Central Texas, Lauren mobilizes other parents to share their stories. “[Strolling Thunder] made me realize just how important it was to not tune out, because decisions that impact our lives are being made every day, whether or not we choose to engage.”

Decisions that affect babies and families are made at all levels of government, not only on Capitol Hill. For that reason, ZERO TO THREE expanded its Think Babies campaign to six states: Colorado, Georgia, New Jersey, North Carolina, Rhode Island, and Washington. Our state partners have engaged more than 350 stakeholders in infant-toddler coalitions, hosted state Strolling Thunder events, and held numerous parent advocacy trainings and listening tours.

To amplify the Think Babies message, we formed relationships with leading children’s policy and advocacy organizations, bringing our roster of national partners to 53 organizations. New national partners added in 2018 include Sesame Workshop, Education Trust, United Parent Leaders Action Network, PolicyLink, and Help Me Grow National Center.

2018 Financials

2018 Revenue

  • 46.2%

    Federal and State Government Grants and Contracts

  • 44.4%

    Private Grants, Contributions and Contracts

  • 8.2%

    Program Service Revenue

  • 1.2%

    Investment Income

2018 Expenses

  • 84.7%
    Program Services

  • 14.3%
    Operations Support

  • 1.1%
    Fundraising and Development

Assets, Liabilities & Net Assets

  • 2018

  • 2017

Assets

$63,491,197
$57,181,667

Liabilities

$10,076,936
$9,862,736

$53,414,262
$47,318,931

Net Assets
Profiles

Connecting passion
with purpose

MIRIAM PHALEN

The Power of Positivity

You can hear the joy and excitement in Miriam Phalen’s voice when she starts to talk about children. “I love babies! They are the biggest joy ever,” she says with enthusiasm. “But I also know how overwhelming and exhausting the early years are and also how important they are. The early years lay the foundation for their future, influencing the child’s well-being far into adolescence and adulthood.”

Phalen, a tireless child advocate for more than 30 years, connected with ZERO TO THREE through the HealthySteps program at Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, New York, where she volunteered her time and expertise in marketing and organizing fundraising events.

Phalen’s gift to ZERO TO THREE funded the creation and dissemination of the Positive Parenting “Power Pack” which featured a special edition poster of our new Positive Parenting infographic, an invitation to an exclusive webinar for members, a quick guide to our full suite of resources, and a digital advocacy toolkit #KeysToPositiveParenting to help our professional network share these resources far and wide.

You can hear the joy and excitement in Miriam Phalen’s voice when she starts to talk about children. “I love babies! They are the biggest joy ever,” she says with enthusiasm. “But I also know how overwhelming and exhausting the early years are and also how important they are. The early years lay the foundation for their future, influencing the child’s well-being far into adolescence and adulthood.”

Phalen, a tireless child advocate for more than 30 years, connected with ZERO TO THREE through the HealthySteps program at Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, New York, where she volunteered her time and expertise in marketing and organizing fundraising events.

Phalen’s gift to ZERO TO THREE funded the creation and dissemination of the Positive Parenting “Power Pack” which featured a special edition poster of our new Positive Parenting infographic, an invitation to an exclusive webinar for members, a quick guide to our full suite of resources, and a digital advocacy toolkit #KeysToPositiveParenting to help our professional network share these resources far and wide.

“We know the negative impact of trauma in the life of a child, and we know the positive impact of a child being raised in a nurturing and loving environment,” Phalen says. “That is why my husband, David, and I support ZERO TO THREE. It is their mission to educate and support parents, caregivers, and early childhood professionals.”

Phalen, who is also a mother and a grandmother, says she wants to see every child reach his or her potential. She believes that is possible through the work of ZERO TO THREE and others passionate about babies and toddlers and their well-being. She had the opportunity to meet many of these like-minded, mission-driven people when she attended her first ZERO TO THREE conference in 2018.

“A child has to feel safe and secure,” Phalen says. “It is our obligation and our responsibility as a society to protect the most vulnerable. If we don’t, who will?”

CLINTON BOYD JR.

A Seat at the Table

As a boy growing up in a poverty-stricken, high-violence, inner-city community, Clinton Boyd Jr. knew that he wanted to be an agent for change. A father at age 16, who didn’t quite know how to be a parent and provide for his child, he quickly realized that many of the child- and family-serving systems in place failed to value and support marginalized fathers such as himself.

“I understood early that love-centered policies and well-functioning systems were important for the societal advancement of Black boys and men,” says the Chicago native. “The hearts of the people creating these systems and policies have to be empathetic toward the plight of those who are poor and disenfranchised.”

With that in mind, Boyd wanted to position himself to be part of the conversation for necessary change. So, in hopes of improving the lives of all children, he pursued an interest and career in sociology, which led him to an 18 month fellowship with ZERO TO THREE in 2016.

“I deeply appreciate the cross-disciplinary and multisector nature of the fellowship,” says the doctoral candidate at Georgia State University. “Until the fellowship, I solely looked at social problems through the lens of a sociologist. Broadening the intellectual scope of my work to include the perspectives of a wide range of

seasoned professionals helped me in profound ways. I enjoyed learning how other disciplines and sectors went about addressing the vexing social problems that wreak havoc in the lives of young children.”

Boyd says he also appreciated the specialized trainings that the Fellows received, such as how to leverage social media platforms. He plans to use what he learned to realize his vision: to develop a holistic, multifaceted fatherhood empowerment program for Black men.

The fellowship gave Boyd access to a network of early childhood professionals with whom he developed deep and meaningful relationships. “What I enjoyed most about the ZERO TO THREE Fellowship was developing lifelong bonds with my cohort members as well as leveraging their professional expertise. Whenever I encountered a roadblock concerning my vision for change, their wise counsel always helped me to circumvent
the obstacle.”

He is also grateful for ZERO TO THREE’s influence on local, state, and federal policies that affect children. “I find solace in knowing I am not alone in the fight for policy and system-level change,” he says. “We all have our unique niche that we bring to the work, but we all have a collective purpose.”

We are tremendously
grateful for the
generosity of our
Baby Champions.

Your continued support allows us to extend our work to advance the proven
power of nurturing relationships. Now more than ever there is much to be done.
Together we can ensure all babies and toddlers have a strong start in life.

Baby Champions

Foundations and Corporations

Alliance for Early Success
Amazon Pay
Amazon Smile Foundation American Institutes for Research AT&T Employee Giving
Allen H. and Selma W. Berkman Charitable Trust
Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation
Bezos Family Foundation
Blue Meridian Partners
Capital One
Carolyn Foundation
Combined Federal Campaign
The Duke Endowment
Einhorn Family Charitable Trust Ford Foundation
Good Done Great
Good Street
Lowell P. and W. Jean Graves Family Foundation
Irving Harris Foundation
Heitman
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation George Kaiser Family Foundation W.K. Kellogg Foundation
A.L. Mailman Family Foundation Maritz Family Foundation
Merck Foundation
Network for Good
Overdeck Family Foundation
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation
Perigee Fund
Pledgeling Foundation
Primrose Schools Children’s Foundation
Robin Hood
Segel Foundation
Stein Early Childhood Development Fund
Philip and Lynn Straus Foundation Tikun Olam Foundation
Turrell Fund
United Way of San Diego University of Wisconsin–Madison Baldwin Wisconsin Idea Endowment USAA
van Ameringen Foundation
World Bank Connections Fund

Individuals

Anonymous (10)
Anonymous in Memory of Ellen and John Tuchler
Pamela Abernathy
Robert Ackley
Sandra Adams
Therese Ahlers
Carol Airone
Mehmet Ak
Melinda Alankar
Barbara and Todd Albert
Madeleine Albright
Karen Alden
Leslie Feder and Michael Allen
Vera Alsova
Dana An
Hayley Anderson
George Askew
Lynette Aytch
Barbra Bachmeier
Susan Balaban
Erika Baril
The Estate of Kathryn E. Barnard, PhD, RN, FAAN
Rachel Barr
Carol Baxter
Ernestine Benedict
Helen Benham
Ronald Benham
Sarah Benjamin
Jennifer Berke
Michael Berman
Bonnie and Richard Berner Paula and William Bernstein
Victor Bernstein
Judith Bertacchi
Peter Bigot
Cynthia Bjork
Celeste Black
Catherine Bodkin
Aidan Bohlander
Jennifer Boss
Anita Brown
Jessie Brown and Chris Fanelli
Kate Brunick
Dorothy Bryan
Terri Buccarelli
Rebecca Burns
Danielle Burton
Jan and Dan Butterwick
Michele Cabrera

Joanne Bitetti Capatides
Mary Caputo
Betsy Carlin
Jurgita Carron
Alice S. Carter
Jude Cassidy
Nicole Castonguay
Samantha Chaifetz
Melinda Chandler
Ginger L. and Robert M. Chang
Elayne Chanil
Dr. Maria D. Chavez
Julia Cherashore
Natalya Chernyak
Stephanie Lin Chow
Elizabeth Christie
M. Susan Claflin
Martha Clark
Bob Closter
Joan Coit-Gross
Marilee Comfort and Phil Gordon
Keith W. Cook
Jonathan Coopersmith and Lisa Helperin
Abel Covarrubias
Lena Cunningham
Rebecca Dacus
Sy Damle and Yael Berger
Nikki Darling-Kuria
Peter Dawson
Allyson Dean
Lia Dean
Taletha Derrington
Jeanne Dietsch
Elizabeth DiLauro
Mary Dodd
Angela Dotson
Millard Drexler
Mary DuBois
Erin Duyka
Janice Edwards
Evelyn Efinger
Helen and Daniel Egger
Nancy and Henry Elghanayan
Martin Elias
Edima Elinewinga
Lise Eliot and William Frost
Robert N. Emde MD
Paula Erdelyi
Jeffrey Evelhoch
Holly Fechner
Sharla Fellers
Lisa Fleiner

Janie Fletcher-Huddleston
William Flumenbaum
Maria Fracasso
Jenifer Goldman Fraser
Allison Freeman
Kaitlin Fronberg
Suzanne Fuller
Bernard Fulton
Susan Gallander
Robert Gallen
Lisa Gans
Maria Gehl
Linda Gilkerson
Walter Gilliam
Gloria Giraldo
Mary Margaret Gleason
Adriane Gonzalez
Rebecca Goze
John Grabert
Mimi Graham
Jacqueline Gran
Laura Grant
Bernadette Gray
Amy Greenberg
Jan Greenberg
Myrna and Stephen Greenberg
Carolyn and Adam Greene
Bruce Gellong
Susan Gross
Will Halicks
Deborah Harris
Andrea Y. Hart
Peter Hart
Sarah Hartman
Hannah Hawley
Jennifer Heck
Mary Claire Heffron
Geraldine Henchy
Dorothy Henderson
Deanna Henrich
Abby Hensley
Scott Herren
Sherry Hiemstra and Decker Anstrom
Sheri Hill and Tim Quagliaroli
Jane Hochman
Benjamin Hoff
Matthew Hohn
Pamela Howard
Erica Lurie Hurvitz
Janice Im
Mark Innocenti
Chandra Ghosh Ippen and Erich Ippen
Christine S. Jackson

Individuals (Continued)

Deidre Jameson
Appudurai Jayanath
Lori Jervis and Paul Spicer
Barbara Jessing
Lilly Jimenez
Emily Johnson
Shay Jones
Brenda Jones Harden
Myra Jones-Taylor
Marian Kaderbek
Mark Kahn
Quinn Kaiser
Barbara Kalmanson
Sheila Kamerman
Rebecca Kang
Wendy Kanter
Diane Kellegrew, PhD
Daniel B. Kessler, MD
Mary Khetani
Won Kim
Shannen Kirchner
Joan Klinkner
Michael Koen
Kirsten Koerner
Boris Kofman
Jon Korfmacher
Jani Kozlowski
Deborah Kravik
Melinda Krippes
Sheri Lacy
Gigi LaGrange
Patricia Lakatos
Valeri Lane
Lester Langer
Karin Larson
Adam Lauring
Lucy Lehr (formerly Hudson)
Donna Levin
Valerie Levy
Madeleine Lieber
Alicia F. Lieberman
Simma and Ron Liebman
Susan Lipstein
Alan Lopatin
Marilyn and John Love
Ben Lundin
Russell Lyman
Whitney Lyman
Sarah Lytle
Trevor Maat
Peter Mangione
Mary Ann Marchel
Joy Markowitz
Emmy Marshall
Peter Mayer
Monica P. McCabe
Peter McCoy
Kendra McDow
Kathleen McEnerny

Matthew Melmed and Lynette Fraga
Lisa Mennet
Andrew Meltzoff
Alan L. Mendelsohn, MD
Lee Mengxuan
Michelle Meyercord
Barbara Miller
Elise Miller
Karen Miller
Stephanie Millian
Mary Ann Mirko
Ellen Mishkin
Terry Monell
Catherine Monk
Cheri Morris
Stephen Mosgrove
Ann Pleshette Murphy
Jeanne Murphy and Bill Oris
Dalora Najera
Brian Napack
Dipesh Navsaria
Christina Nigrelli
Wendy Nilsen
Vonda Jump Norman
Obinna Childcare Center
Michael Ofjord
Michael Olenick
Joy Osofsky
The Parlakian/Giammo Family
Heather Paulus
Jeree Pawl
Jolene Pearson
Carol Perkins
Whitney Pesek
Miriam Phalen
Bee Moua Pham
Vonnita Pinkett-Reap
Lynn Pleshette
Gary Polinski
Nan Poplin
Stefanie Powers
Giang Quach
Stacy and Keith Raine
Alicia Rainville
Marsha Raulerson, MD FAAP Shauna Reinhart
Julia Richards
Alice Ricks
Esther Rojas
Michael Rosa
Katherine Rosenblum
Saeid Saeidian
Christin Scarello
Katherine Locker Scharlatt
David Schiffman
Hilary Schlossman
Nan Schwanfelder
James Schweitzer
Prachi Shah, MD

Rizwan Shah
Rebecca Shahmoon Shanok
Kellen Shide
Laura Shiflett
Brian Sholis
Patricia Shure
Catherine Siegel
Terry Siegel
Judith Silver
Nicole Slaughter
Rose-Ella Slavin
Petra Smith
Anna Smyke, PhD
Joanne Solchany
Charlene Sosa
Julissa Sparks
Maria Spriggs
Elinor Springer
Christy Stanton
Karen Stecher
Mindy and Gene Stein
Thomas Stengel
Pamela Stewart
Barbara Stroud
Rhonda Stroud
Mike Stuart
Norman and Bonita Sutin
Eleanor and Peter Szanton
Anastasia Tarasenko
Lynn Tepper, in honor of Mimi Graham
Barbara A. Thompson
Ross A. Thompson
Lenore Thompson
Craig and Trasie Topple
Jennifer Tracey
Steven Ulosevich
Trenna Valado
Douglas Vanderbilt
Eric Vaughn
Michelle Verduzco
Lois Vermilya
Johanna Vetter
Judith Viorst
Stephanie Voorhees
Anne Waddoups
Susan Waggoner
Virginia Ward
David and Mary Ann Wark
Marjorie Beeghly Wasek
Deborah Weatherston
Judith Weinstock
Sandra Weiss
Steven Welton
Jane West
Norman West
Jodi Whiteman
Alexandra Whyte
Sue Williams
George Williamson

Amy Williamson
David W. Willis, MD
Monique Wilson
Earl Winchester
Sandra R. Wolkoff, PhD, LCSW-R
Julia Yeary
Jean and John Yule
Zohreh Zarnegar
Charley Zeanah
Caitlin Zimmer

Public Funds

Arkansas Department of
Human Services
Connecticut State Department
of Children and Families
Frederick County, MD Department
of Social Services
Magellan Federal
National Traumatic Stress Network New York City Department of Health U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Health Resources and Services Administration
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Administration for Children and Families

Annual Conference Sponsors

Branagh Information Group
Brindle Foundation
Brookes Publishing Co.
Child Care Aware of America Child360
CuddleBright Experience by Simms/Mann Institute
Educare Learning Network
First 5 California
First 5 LA
First 5 San Diego
HighScope Educational Research Foundation
Kaplan Early Learning Company
King County Developmental Disabilities Division
LENA Research Foundation
PEDStest
Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego San Diego Regional Center Southwest Human Development Tikun Olam Foundation

Leadership

Leadership

Board Officers

Paul G. Spicer, Ph.D.
President

Professor of Anthropology
Center for Applied Social Research
University of Oklahoma

Brenda Jones Harden, Ph.D.
Vice President

Professor,
Department of Human Development
and Quantitative Methodology
University of Maryland

Brian A. Napack
Treasurer

President and CEO, Wiley

Walter Gilliam, Ph.D.
Chair of the Committee on the Board

Associate Professor in the Child Study Center;
Associate Professor of Psychology; Director, The Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy Yale Child Study Center

Ross A. Thompson, Ph.D.
Immediate Past President

Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology
University of California-Davis

Matthew Melmed, J.D.
Executive Director

ZERO TO THREE

Executive Leadership

Matthew Melmed
Executive Director

Ernestine Benedict
Chief Communications Officer

Janice Im
Chief Program Officer

Myra Jones-Taylor
Chief Policy Officer

Kathleen McEnerny
Chief Development Officer

Elise Miller
Chief Product and Innovation Officer

Laura Shiflett
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer

Board Members

Robert Chang
Chief Strategy Officer
Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy (IMSA)

Lia Dean
Senior Vice President
Capital One

Robert N. Emde, M.D.
Professor of Psychiatry, Emeritus,
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center;
Adjunct Professor of Psychology, University of Denver
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center

Chandra Ghosh Ippen, Ph.D.
Assoc. Director, Child Trauma Research Program;
Director of Dissemination & Implementation for
Child-Parent Psychotherapy
University of California-San Francisco

Mary Margaret Gleason, M.D. F.A.A.P.
Pediatrician and Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist Director
Tulane Infant Mental Health Services
Tulane University

Donna Levin
Co-Founder, Care.com
Entrepreneur in Residence, Martin Trust Center
for MIT Entrepreneurship
Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

John M. Love
Consultant
Ashland Institute for Early Childhood Science and Policy

Tammy Mann
President and CEO
The Campagna Center

Andrew N. Meltzoff
Co-Director, Institute for Learning
& Brain Sciences
University of Washington

Lisa Mennet, Ph.D.
Founder and Clinical Director
Cooper House

Michelle Meyercord
Marketing Consultant

Catherine Monk, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Medical Psychology
(in Psychiatry and Obstetrics and Gynecology)
Columbia University

Michael R. Olenick, Ph.D.
President and CEO
Child Care Resource Center

Rizwan Shah, M.D., F.A.A.P.
Former Medical Director
Blank Children’s Hospital

Eugene P. Stein
President and CEO
Tikun Olam Foundation

Marilyn Stein
Chairman
Tikun Olam Foundation

Barbara Thompson
Former Director, Office of Military
Family Readiness Policy, Dept. of Defense

Ginger Ward
Founder and CEO
Southwest Human Development

H. Marcel Wright
Vice President of Behavioral Health Services
Adventist Healthcare

Charles H. Zeanah, Jr., M.D.
Mary Peters Sellars Polchow Chair of Psychiatry,
Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, and Vice Chair
for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Tulane University School of Medicine
Director of the Institute of Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health

We’re working hard to ensure that all babies and toddlers have a strong start in life.

Stay up-to-date on our work in 2019 at zerotothree.org

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We’re working hard to ensure that all babies and toddlers have a strong start in life.

Stay up-to-date on our work in 2018 at zerotothree.org

Join Us:  FacebookTwitter | LinkedIn

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